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January

Start work in your garden


Garden Furniture

January is a forward-looking month when we can plan what could achievable over the coming year. The possibilities are endless with new varieties of flowers, fruit and vegetables to grow and brand new products to try. Let's see what is new for 2012 and how these items are going to make our gardening easier and more exciting.


Planting
BBQ

Spend some time this month planning what you want to plant and when. Salad vegetables and some fruits need to be planted early so make sure you are organised!

A wide variety of seeds and bulbs are available to buy in most Asda stores from February onwards.

For all the ethical gardeners out there, now is the time to install your new water butt, or check and clean your existing one.

Using our great value range of both garden power tools and hand tools, ensure your hedges and shrubs are trimmed and shaped to perfection for the coming growing season.


Top Tip

Recycle your Christmas tree and shred it for mulch to add to your compost.


February

Start work in your garden

Plant - Peas, Salad Onions and Raspberries

Harvest - Rosemary


Garden Tools

Very often the coldest month of the year, February can also include rain and milder spells that will encourage the growth of plants and your own outdoor activity.

Take your mind off the cold weather and look forward to sunnier times with a spot of seed sowing in your shed or greenhouse!


Planting
Garden Buildings

As we are getting ever closer to planting out, spend some time adding any fertiliser, compost and mulch to your soil to prepare for seedlings and bulbs.

Some summer harvest vegetables such as peas and salad onions can be sown.

Potato tubers can be allowed to sprout and then planted. Potatoes grow quite happily in large pots or sacks placed on a sunny patio or balcony. Set the tubers out in egg boxes or the bottom of a seed tray and keep them somewhere in good light that is cool and frost-free.

Keep dead-heading winter pansies and feed occasionally with plant Food when the weather is mild.


Top Tip

Snowdrops will be blooming if we get mild weather in February. Remember to divide any overcrowded clumps immediately after flowering has finished as the bulbs move much better when the plant is in leaf.


£179.00

March

Start work in your garden

Plant - Rhubarb, Garlic, Tomatoes and Carrots

Maintain - Gooseberries, Blackcurrants and Raspberries


Grow Your Own

Officially it's the first month of spring and we now have plenty of opportunities to start serious gardening. There's the vegetable patch to prepare, seeds to sow and the flower border to plan. Getting some jobs completed in March is one way to ensure your garden work doesn't overwhelm you. Here are a few ideas for a plan of action that will get you a few steps ahead of the crowd.


Planting

Spring bulbs will be starting to bloom with crocus and daffodils, filling your garden with a bright colour display.

It's time to complete the pruning of rose bushes, cutting stems back by two thirds to an outward facing bud. This will encourage new stems growth and many more beautiful blooms.

Sow sweet peas in pots of Multi-Purpose Compost and keep in a sheltered spot where a temperature around 12 degrees C can be easily maintained.

Vegetables such as onions and carrots can be planted out, and tomato bags can be started in the greenhouse or a warm sunlit indoor area like a deep windowsill.

Birds can be a problem on some soft fruit, to avoid damage to crops net the bushes with material stretched taut between canes well away from the stems.

Top Tip

Dig the last of your leeks – if left in the ground too long they produce flower stems in the centre that are too hard to eat.

Lawncare
Garden Decor

Rake your lawn to encourage grass stems to stand straight before mowing for the first time this season.

After mowing, use a grass seed such as evergreen complete or if you have a lawn that is hampered by moss, why not try lawn feed, weed and moss killer to encourage a glorious green lawn to enjoy in the warmer months?

When the moss has been removed you may well find that there are bare patches which will need to be reseeded.


Top Lawncare Tip

Tidy up the edges of the lawn with a half-moon cutting tool or long-handled shears to provide a really sharp divide between the grass and the surrounding borders.

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April

Grow Your Own Fruit and Veg

Plant - Beetroot, Cucumber, Radish, Parsley, Rocket, Mint and Sunflowers

Maintain - Peas

Harvest - Daffodils


As plants in the garden put on new leaf growth and spring bulbs, shrubs and fruit trees provide attractive blooms it's time to get your hands dirty and get stuck in to some real gardening!

As evenings start to get longer it's time to get those burgers sizzling on the grill by having your first barbecue of the year.

Beds and Borders
Garden Care

Weeds are the first job to be tackled if you are going to have a clean and tidy garden this spring. If they are left to grow unfettered they will swamp your flower border robbing the soil and the surrounding plants of available nutrients, moisture and space. The quickest way to clear the weeds is to spray them with weedkiller.


Patio Gardening

If you have a conservatory or greenhouse it's time to plant up hanging baskets and patio pots using the seedlings you planted in March.

Use colours that match and you can create a delightful combination of blending colours that will please the eye. Go for contrasting hues and you will attract more interest for your bold use of colour.


Garden Power
Lawncare

After a really cold winter laced with plenty of heavy rainfall and a period under snow, lawns in most areas of the country are looking a sorry sight.

Spiking areas that could be infected by disease will improve drainage and help to halt their spread.

After you have cut your lawn in April apply a grass seed by walking up and down the lawn to scatter the granules evenly over the area and the jobs done. It should take you no longer than 10 minutes to treat the average sized lawn.


Vegetables and Herbs

It's a busy time as there are plenty of seeds to be sown including Broad beans, beetroot, Brussels sprouts, carrots, cauliflower, leeks, onion sets, rocket, spinach, spring onions and turnip.

Fruit

It's time to feed gooseberries, redcurrants, apples and pears with a general plant food. Similarly the fast growing fruit such as blackcurrants, loganberries, blackberries and raspberries will all need some generous feeding so that they can give of their best.

Top Tip

Sowing seeds in compost is the easiest way to start your own herb collection and you can find packets of basil, coriander, chives and parsley at your local Asda.

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May

Grow Your Own Fruit and Veg

Plant - Sweetcorn, Rosemary, Coriander and French Beans

Maintain - Peas

Harvest - Daffodils


Probably the busiest month of the gardening calendar!

At this time most of us will be planting out tender bedding plants, summer seeds and vegetable plants such as beans and tomatoes. Weeds will also be running riot in any bare patch of soil.

Beds and Borders

When planting out bedding, give the plants a thorough watering in the trays or pots the night before planting so they have had a good drink. Select your plants for the conditions your garden offers.

In shady spots buzy lizzies and fibrous rooted begonias will thrive without too much direct sun. In hot, sunny spots plant those that are more tolerant to drought conditions including geraniums, petunias, verbena and Californian poppy.

Lawns
Outdoor Fun

Grass will be growing really fast in the warm bright weather, so you will need to mow your lawn each week. Make sure you put the cut grass to good use by creating your own compost bin. You can turn this into rich compost by mixing it with vegetable peelings from the kitchen and cardboard or scrunched up newspapers.


Patio Gardening

Hanging baskets of summer flowers may not be as fashionable as they used to be, but they do make a spectacular statement next to front doors and beside patio dining areas.

You will get colour from the end of May through until the first frost in October.

Patios are excellent places for growing a wide range of salads, fruit and vegetables. Plant three tomatoes in one Tomato bag Planter in late May and you can expect to pick many kilos of ripe, tasty fruit before the end of summer. Similarly if you have a sunny space you can grow bell peppers, chilli peppers and aubergines in pots.

Best guaranteed crops are the lettuce and tasty salad leaves such as rocket, mizuna, land cress, frisee and chervil. Grown in containers in an all Purpose Growing Compost instead of directly in border soil, your leaves of rocket will be less likely to be affected by pests.


Vegetables
Garden Furniture

There are plenty of vegetable seeds to be sown now that we are in May.

Sweetcorn, runner beans, French beans, squash, courgettes and outdoor cucumbers can't stand cold nights and could be killed if there is a late frost. They are best sown in pots of compost and kept protected indoors until the end of the month when the small seedlings are planted out in the garden.

The hardier seeds that can go directly into shallow drills out in the garden include carrots, lettuce, broccoli, spinach, radish and peas.

Keep weeds under control around the stems of apples, pears and soft fruit such as raspberries and loganberries.


Top Tip

Potatoes should be sprouting through the soil in May and are fine while no ground frosts are predicted. To protect the foliage from threatened frost draw a small amount of soil over the leaves.

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June

Grow Your Own Fruit and Veg

Maintain - Cucumber, Coriander and French Beans

Harvest - Mint, Rocket, Potatoes, Peas, Radish, Salad Onions


It's summer at last and your garden should be looking great and ready to burst into a riot of flower colour and productive vegetable and fruit growing. Make sure you are enjoying your hard work by taking the time to relax on one of our great quality and value furniture sets.

Patio Gardening
BBQ

You will need to start regular watering of pots and other containers to encourage steady growth of patio plants. But your compost will soon run out of nutrients and supplementary feeding will become essential five or six weeks after planting. The traditional way to keep bedding plants growing and blooming well is by adding a soluble plant food into the water of a watering can.

Find a shady spot outside where houseplants can have a summer holiday. This is especially beneficial to plants that have been trimmed down to size and are producing new shoots.


Top Tip

Check the brackets used for hanging baskets to ensure they are fixed firmly enough for a water-filled container.

Lawn Care

Why not invest in a new mower to ensure your lawn gets cut evenly, sharply and without mashing the grass blades? If using a hover mower, always collect the cut grass by using a lawn rake, otherwise the cuttings create a thick mat layer which after it builds to over 2cm thick does positive harm to the growing grass.

For a great looking lawn all summer you need to feed the lawn so that it is thick and lush and an ideal resting place for sunbathing or summer picnics. An application of grass seed will show visible results in just a few days.


Garden Tools
Vegetables

See that your vegetables are kept well watered now that the days are long and the sun is at its highest. They should all be growing really fast!

Sow French beans and runner beans from early June until the end of July. Preparing a trench that is rich in compost is the traditional way to provide the most consistent crops.

If you haven't done so already sow sweet corn seed in individual pots of compost, grouping together in clumps rather than in a straight line.

Feed and water well, and your corn will grow tall in no time and produce the sweetest cobs you have ever tasted in just 8 to 10 weeks.

Tomatoes, cucumbers, sweet peppers, courgettes, squash and pumpkins can all be planted outside.

Early potatoes may be ready to harvest at the end of the month. To check on progress check around underground with your finger tips to feel how the potatoes are growing and pull out just the biggest ones. That saves destroying the plant completely and allows more potatoes to form over the next few weeks.

Fruit

Sideshoots of apples, pears and gooseberries should be cut back to three or four leaves. This stops stem growth and encourages the shoot to carry flowers and subsequent fruit in following years.

Plums often set more fruit than needed and should be thinned out now otherwise the weight may damage branches.

Continue to pick strawberries and raspberries from summer fruiting varieties.



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July

Feed and Protect Your Plants

Maintain - Sweetcorn

Harvest - Parsley, Raspberries, Coriander, Roses, Blackberries, Tomatoes, Carrots, Cucumber, Gooseberries, Beetroot, Garlic and French Beans


It's mid summer and it's time to prepare the garden for holidays and relaxing family times. Hopefully barbecues and outdoor eating will provide enjoyable get-togethers with friends and family and opportunities to show off your garden!

Beds and Borders
Garden Buildings

As flowers fade it's a good idea to remove the dead and dying heads of flowering bedding plants so that the plant is denied the opportunity to set seed. This dead-heading ensures the plant continues to produce even more blooms in its attempt to set seed and complete its lifetime job.

Other jobs that will increase the flower power in your garden includes watering if the soil becomes dry and feeding over the leaves and around the roots on a fortnightly basis.


Top Tip

Sow seeds of winter pansies, wallflowers and forget-me-nots so that you will have good sized seedlings ready to plant out at the beginning of autumn.

Patio Gardening
Grow Your Own

As the roots of flowers and vegetables growing in containers and hanging baskets get bigger, the compost will need watering more frequently.

Continue to sow seeds of cut-and-come-again lettuce and salad leaves in containers. They will provide tender edible foliage for late summer salads.


Lawn Care

Watering is vital to a decent lawn in mid-summer when dry periods of several days are common. The trick with lawn watering is to give the area a complete soak once a week instead of wetting just the surface regularly. This is the easiest way to ensure your lawn is lush and healthy throughout the summer.

Vegetables

Picking of runner beans, French beans and courgettes should start in July.

New potatoes such as Swift and Maris Bard should be ready for an early harvest in July where they will provide a really tasty crop for a Sunday treat.

Top Tip

If you have the space plant out winter green seedlings such a winter cauliflowers, sprouting broccoli.

Fruit

The branches of plum trees are particularly brittle, but can be tied to an upright stem to help bear the weight.

Strawberry plants will now be sending out "runners" that carry new plants on the end of long, thin stems. You can easily propagate new plants that will extend your collection or replace plants that have become old and of low productivity.

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August

Feed and Protect Your Plants


Garden Decor

The traditional holiday season is with us and a complete month off from school and college heralds a more leisurely time in the garden. Most people have more time to sit and contemplate the beauty of their garden plants while lawns should be lush and green enough for everyone to lie on and to picnic.

Beds and Borders

August normally brings more rainfall than earlier months, this along with the warm summer temperatures means garden plants to be growing strongly and blooming profusely. To match this growth spurt you need to dead-head all fading blooms and to feed bedding plants to encourage a fresh flush of flowers.

Plant out winter-flowering pansies as soon as the seedlings are large enough to move.


Patio Gardening

Regular watering and feeding of container plants and hanging baskets is a summer essential. You may find that putting drip trays under pots will help to thoroughly water potted plants.

These trays will catch any excess water that will be absorbed back into the compost to ensure it is totally wet.


Lawn Care

It's picnic time! Trim the grass each week for the best results, taking off all the cuttings so these don't stick to clothes or bare feet of your picnic guests.

Clean sharp edges to the lawn really smarten up the garden and are vital if you are inviting guests. Trim the sideways growing grass with a strimmer or pair of long-handled shears and see that the border is weed free.


Garden Care
Vegetables

Your Sunday lunch plate should be full of plenty of home-grown vegetables this month including potatoes, broad beans, climbing French and runner beans and courgettes. Meal times should see a harvest of tomatoes, lettuce, radish, salad leaves and beetroot giving you rich rewards from all your spring labour.

Continue to sow salad leaves every couple of weeks to provide tasty greenery for the autumn. Many of the herbs now in full leaf can be collected. Try chopping up leaves finely and freeze under water in ice cube trays for later use. This is a great method for adding the fresh taste of mint to potatoes during midwinter.

Tomatoes should now be ripening on crops growing outdoors on the patio and in any greenhouse or conservatory. Continue to tap each flower truss every day to ensure good pollination and try to ensure the compost or soil is kept evenly moist at all times.


Top Tip

Plant out seedlings of Brussels sprouts and winter cabbage now in soil and compost.

Fruit

Ripening fruits from blueberries, gooseberries and redcurrants should be picked as soon as they are ripe. Protection from birds with netting may prove worthwhile.

Once all the fruit has been picked from summer fruiting raspberries, cut out all these old canes that have borne fruit down to ground level. Tie in the shoots that will be replacing them and water the roots thoroughly to ensure a good crop next year. Raspberries that fruit from now, until the autumn need a thorough watering.

Top Tip

As plums and other fruits ripen they will attract wasps to feed so be careful when picking fruit!

Product No: 001-665454
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September

Prepare your lawn and Garden for Winter

Maintain - Rosemary

Harvest - Sweetcorn


Garden Power

Autumn is soon to be with us, while the nights continue to draw in we can expect to have some warm sunny days followed by some cold nights with the chance of early frosts in central areas.

In the garden it's time to pick top fruit, clear away dead summer flowers and tidy up lawns in preparation for winter.


Beds and Borders

Clear the annual flowers from your garden and deposited these plants in your compost bin. To improve the chance of Daffodils and tulips flowering in spring, dig out and separate the old bulbs and replant them in a new panting hole.

It's a good time to cut hedges. With all hedges try to create a tapering shape that is thinner at the top than the base. This slope will help snow to fall off the hedge that could otherwise pull down branches.


Lawn Care
Outdoor Fun

As temperatures drop and rainfall increases then the growth of grass tends to slow down in preparation for winter hibernation.

The first lawn job in September is to adjust the cutting height of the blades so the grass is left a little longer at each cut. And before you mow next it's a good idea to rake the whole lawn to pull out any dead material and lift up any grass runners so they can be trimmed by the mower.


Top Tip

Reduce mowing frequency to once a fortnight now that cooler daytime temperatures have reduced rapid grass growth.

Vegetables

Vegetables should be being harvested right through September and some of them stored away for winter use. You can freeze the excess crop of runner (stick) beans and French beans.

To harvest onions for the longest life lift each bulb out with a fork on a dry day. When the leaves have shrivelled back lift all the bulbs and let them dry during on a patio. Select only the unblemished onions for storage.

When the foliage of main crop potatoes turn brown this means they are ready for harvesting and storage. Simply cut off the foliage, and wait about ten days before harvesting. Use a fork to lift the potatoes to the surface where they should be left for a few hours for the skins to harden off. Like with onions store only the unblemished potatoes. To reduce the risk of a rotten potato ruining your whole crop, store them in a number of small cardboard or wooden boxes instead of large sacks.

Tomatoes, sweet peppers and aubergines growing in pots will still need watering regularly to encourage quick ripening and maximum flavour.

The soil at the base of Brussels sprouts will need firming with the heel of your boot and stems may need staking with a sturdy cane to ensure vertical growth in autumn winds.


Fruit

Plums should be picked as they ripen to give great fruit for pies and crumbles. If you clear up any damaged fruit that falls to the ground on a regular basis you will also reduce any wasp problem. Any excess crop that can't be eaten straight away can be frozen for making into great winter puddings at a later date.

Pears should be ready for picking before they start to fall and some early ripening apples, such as 'Discovery' will be sweet enough for harvest during September.

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October

Prepare your lawn and Garden for Winter


Garden Furniture

Falling leaves, high winds and plenty of autumn rains can be expected in October. Thankfully a lot of the time we get similar amounts of sunshine to balance the wet weather and the soil is an ideal temperature to encourage roots of newly planted shrubs, hedging and other hardy plants.

Beds and Borders

Planting of bulbs for next year's flowers should be continued as daffodils and crocus need to be in the ground as early as possible this month.

Dwarf rockery narcissi are worth planting in containers or on the edges of the flower border. Completing the planting of the winter flower bed with specially selected bedding plants will make all the difference this autumn.

While you are tidying up, store away water hoses and other watering equipment in a frost-free position to extend the life of this vital material.

Patio Gardening

Pots of spring colour need planting now if roots are to develop before the really hard weather of winter. The easiest way to ensure colour from March through until June is to plant different types of bulbs in one pot and to move this into a prominent position as the flower buds start to colour.

This is a great time to kill off any weeds on gravel paths, drives and waste ground to leave the surface clean and weed-free for the winter.


Lawn Care

Autumn is a good time to rake through your lawn to remove any thatch that develops from small pieces of cut grass that form a layer close to the soil surface.


BBQ
Vegetables and Fruits

Harvest all outdoor tomatoes, even if they are green and hang the trusses in a shed, porch or well-lit spare room. They will continue to ripen.

Marrows and winter squash should also be harvested and stored away when the skins have toughened. Even when the skin of winter squash are pale yellow they should harden off and turn more pale orange if they are kept on a sunny windowsill for a few weeks. Store the fruits in a frost-free shed, garage or greenhouse for eating during winter.

Pot up seedlings of herbs in a Herb Planter to be grown on a sunny kitchen windowsill. Garlic cloves need to be sown this side of the winter solstice so they develop a good root system.

Pick any apples or pears that are ripe and either eat immediately or store in a cool, dark frost-free place. Any fruits that carry a blemish need to be eaten immediately, as these will not store well.

Pruning soft fruit including gooseberry and blackcurrant bushes should be completed now. Take out about a third of all branches on red, white and blackcurrants to leave room for new shoots.

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November

Prepare your lawn and Garden for Winter


Garden Tools

Cold nights and damp days can be expected towards the end of the year, Days are now very short and it's dark before tea time, so make the most of sunshine outdoors to keep the garden clean and tidy.


Lawn Care

November is the month when you will need to collect fallen leaves every week to ensure the grass doesn't die off in the shadow of ever-falling foliage. Some mowers will collect leaves fairly efficiently, alternatively you could use a leaf blower, or leaf collectors to gather the fallen leaves form your lawn. If fallen leaves are chopped small and mixed with plenty of grass cuttings they should rot down easily over the next few months when mixed with ordinary kitchen waste on the compost heap.

Fork your lawn in order to aerate the soil and even out the surface level.

Top Tip

Continue to cut the lawn every fortnight while it is actively growing, which could be through until January when really cold weather finally halts grass growth.


Vegetables and Fruits
Garden Buildings

With careful planning you should be starting to harvest the first of your winter vegetables including parsnips, red cabbage, leeks and early Brussels sprouts.

For great tasting parsnips dig a few and leave on the soil surface so that frosts can help to change carbohydrates into sugars and thus sweeten the flavour.

Where you have bare soil, dig over the area ready for next year's crops.

In the fruit garden it's the best time to plant bush, cane and tree fruits such as redcurrants, blackcurrants, raspberry canes and apples and pears. When planting, ensure that your soil is improved with rich compost so that new roots are encouraged to spread out into your new soil.


Top Tip

Pick the last of apples and pears and start winter pruning.

£89.00

December

Prepare your lawn and Garden for Winter


Outdoor Fun

As we come to the end of the year it's a good time to take a few minutes to write down the successes and failures you've had this season and to note any lessons learned.


Top Tip

Don't forget to add gardening gifts to your festive gifts list!




Top Tip

Keep off the grass when ground frost has covered every blade with ice crystals. Walking over frosted grass will physically bruise where you tread and will leave brown foot prints that last several weeks before they grow out.


Top Tip

Check your netting protection for overwintering brassicas such as sprouts and sprouting broccoli to keep away packs of birds.